Buen Camino Peregrino!

All good things come from above. James

Ana's Place for the Ordinary.

Ana's Place for the Ordinary.

Buen Camino Peregrino!

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Expressions: the afterlife of color April 21st, 2016 / Behind the scenes




Cover art by Fredy Villamil
 
Victor Fragoso, David Fernandez, Fredy Villamil, Ana Barbosa, Ninoska Perez Castellon
 

There are no coincidences, so they say or better said by ― Laura Pedersen, Best Bet, “Coincidence is God's way of being anonymous.”   I happen to agree.

A couple of years ago, I was invited to the Opening Reception of the newly built majestic and beautiful
Milander Center for Arts and Entertainment. As good luck would have it, after casual conversation and a bit of merriment, I was thrilled when David Fernandez, Special Events Coordinator for the City of Hialeah, asked me to curate the Hispanic Heritage opening of  "La Mano Hispana 2014." I have him to thank for opening the door to my romance with Milander, her halls, walls and patrons. It was my good fortune and a clean cut case of serendipity.  Happily, I have been a staple at the Center ever since in one way or another. 
 
Last November, I once again embraced the task of populating the walls of Milander for the ""La Mano Hispana 2015." 
I began to gather artists feverishly to fulfill the vision I had for a diverse body of work; from arts and crafts to abstract to finely rendered. I deferred to my good friend Miguel Rodez, a gem of an artist, curator, all around talent and professional, for advice and artists .  He kindly contacted a few people to include in the exhibit; one in particular arrived with a
whimsical paintbrush, Fredy Villamil.
 
It was magic! Opening night was whelming for all, but for one visual artist it was as singular a moment as Halley's Comet; the "City of Progress" welcomed him with open arms, Fredy Villamil.  There is not much I can say about that; you just had to be there and I was
 
As a result, Fredy was offered a return to Milander to show in his own solo exhibit the following year.  After much thought, he decided to deliver a collective body of work instead; we teamed up and opened the show to a few of our amazing local talent. Once we hit the ground running  Expressions: the afterlife of color was born.
 

Fredy Villamil, Ana Barbosa, Miguel Rodez





Elizabeth Nickerson for Hialeah TV
 
Here is a sampling below of some of the art that can be seen at Milander.  You are welcomed to visit the gallery
Monday through Friday
 from  9 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. and
from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
 
School groups welcomed by appointment and
Evening hours by appointment
by calling 305-889-5705
If there is something you really would like to own, that can be arranged.  The art is for sale.




El Carnaval by Adriano Nicot
2 m x 2m Mixed Media on Canvas $10,000
 
 
$2,800
 
 


La Busqueda by Bibiana Cervantes
62 x 24 Mixed Media on Canvas $1800


Series: Chasing the Light  Santiago by William Riera
15 x 20 Digital Photography Print $200


Libre Primavera by Damian Hidlago Bulte
$10,000


Reflejos by Damian Yonel
Oil on Canvas $1,800




Harvest Moon by Dania Sierra
30 x 40 Oil on Canvas $5,000
 
 
Elevation by Ana Juncadella Barbosa
20 x 24 Mixed Media on Canvas $750
 


The Future by Liliam Dominguez
30 x 40 Photography Pigment Ink $2000



Eye of Salvador - January 16 by Miguel Rodez
78" Acrylic on Canvas  $21,000


Keila by Fredy Villamil
12 x16 Oil on Canvas  $1,100


Face by Jorge Santos
Oil on Canvas $12,000


Aves del Paraiso by Jesus Rivera
72 x 58 Oil and Crayon $4,500


Sin Titulo by Leduan Spindola
2m x 2m Mixed Media on Canvas $3000


La Dama de Hierro #4 by Maria Carballo
Pop Art Sculpture $1,200


Gallita Tocando Piano by Omar Corrales Mora
48 x 28 Oil on Canvas $1,000


La Fiera by Pablo Carreno
28 x 36 Acrylic on Canvas $5,000
 



Dark Forest by Pepe Romero
30 x 40 Mixed Media $2,500


The Safari by Ramon Pedraza
48 x 28 Mixed Media $1500

Barro by Patty Suau
32 x 32 Colored pencil on pink paper $700


Frutera Tropical by Rau Bravo
20 x 24 Acrylic on Canvas $320

 



La Primera Pareja by Raul Hernandez
48 x 36 Oil on Canvas $4,500


Dama by Raul Lorenzo
48 x 36 Oil on Canvas $1,500


Danzar es Libertad by Raul Proenza
30 x 40 Mixed Media $2,000


Effusion by Santa Olaya (Hiremio Garcia)
80 x 43 Mixed Media $7,000


Arlequin by Sergio Chavez
14 x16 Acrylic on Cardboard $350


Primeavera en el plato by Santos Mendez
42 x 44 Acrylic on Canvas $3,800


La Nave by Juan Antonio Rodriguez
48 x 36 Oil on Canvas $6,000
La Diva by Ninoska Perez Castellon
2 x 2.5 Pastel, watercolor and ink $750


The Black Sting by Victor Fragoso
Jewlery  Mighty black onyx; Gold; Ruby eyes; white enamel $2,200


Pleasure of Mind #70 by Victor Gomez
32.5 x 22.5 Oil Monotype $1,700

 Buho by Juan C. Gonzalez Sanchez
Marmol Negro $5,350


Mujer en Azul by Wilfredo Torres
21 x 27 Acrylic on Canvas $800
 
 
 
 
Special thanks to  Haynel Negueruela for bringing us  Vitico Valdez and his jazz band.
 
Stay tuned for more attractions at
the Milander Center for the Arts and Entertainment,
 4800 Palm Avenue, Hialeah, Florida

Thursday, December 31, 2015

A special toast and a private joke...let it go.


"Although inspired in part by a true incident, the following story  does depict actual persons or events." 

For centuries, champagne has been the preferred choice for celebrating life’s finest moments. Madame de Pompadour ordered it by the gallon for her parties: 1800 bottles were consumed during one masked ball at the Hotel de Ville in 1739.

Benedictine monks around Carcassone started producing sparkling wine in the early 1500’s. From there the process for creating sparkling wine evolved for several centuries. Monk Dom Perignon, who was originally charged with finding a solution for troublesome bubbly wine that resulted in many exploded bottles each spring.

On this occasion of the end of the year, I absolutely have to raise a glass and toast to those condescending inglorious individuals who find it necessary to show their superior command of everything: e.g. bubbly pouring and picture hanging. After many a verbal flogging, I thought I should share these instructions so that others do not fall prey to the same kind of tyranny; a lesson in let it go.



 
HOW TO OPEN CHAMPAGNE
First, dry the bottle and remove the foil from the wire cage, keeping cork pointed away from people, pets, food and valuable objects. Undo the wire cage encasing cork and hold the cork (a towel may be used here) with one hand, while slowly turning the bottle with the other until the cork begins to free up. The cork should not pop loudly, but sigh quietly—and happily.
HOW TO SERVE CHAMPAGNE
To reduce the exposed surface area, sparkling wines are usually served in glasses with a narrow opening, such as flutes or tulips. These shapes help to conserve the bubbles. Although usually served alone when celebrating or toasting, sparkling wines combine well with different juices and flavors and are a key ingredient in many cocktails.
TO POUR
Wrap the neck of the bottle with a clean towel or napkin (not paper). Hold the base in one hand, with your thumb in the punt (the concave bottom) and fingers spread out along the barrel of the bottle. Use your other hand to support the neck.  Prime the glass by pouring a bit on the inside wall of the glass, wait for the mousse to temper and then pour more. Little bubbles should come to the surface. This indicates that there is nothing wrong with the wine and that the glass has no contaminates on it. It also prevents frothing over. Pour glasses to about two-thirds full. If pouring for several people, pour an inch or so into each glass, and then go around again.

Hanging pictures on walls:
I confess, it took me a few weeks to recover from the conversation that implied I did not know how to hang... I found the ability to let it go.

I will add that there is an exacting practice as to how to hang art on walls! Rule of thumb '5 feet 4 inches' to the middle of the painting which is equivalent to Ana (me) height....perfect.  I like that about me; perfect arm extension for hanging simple pieces.



On a final note, a toast to us! Let it go! 

Reveillon Joyeux - Welcome to 2016


As I trekked to work on the last day of 2015, I was startled when the driver in the car next to me honked and asked that I roll down my window. Instantly, I expected that I would be informed that I was dealing with a flat tire or a dangling car part from the rear. I rolled down the window with hesitation expecting the worst.

I thought, "good grief! " I looked over in order to find out what terrible problem I would face in the final hours of the last day of the year; the driver paused with a smile and said, "I just wanted to wish you a happy new year's eve day and God bless you."

I guess I was touched by an angel.  I am now passing this kind gesture to all of you!


Bonne soirée & Bonne nuit à tous et à toutes !
 
 "Bon Chemin et 
 JOYEUSES FETES DE FIN D'ANNEE "
 
Buen Camino!

Friday, November 20, 2015

It's all about the cake!

 
 
On the occasion of my birth, my mother snipped and saved this little ditty of a newspaper clipping to mark the exceptional day in which I had gallantly arrived into this world. 
  
To date, I have googled extensively 'el Dia del Abuelo' as seen on the snip above only to find that perhaps it was not really the day commemorating 'abuelos' everywhere. It was my mom's way of  memorializing my first day ever in print.
 
 
On this day and every day I give thanks to my family and friends. A big shout out to my mother who has made the world a better place for everyone. I thank God for the many years that she continues to live every day. Its been a good ride. God bless everyone.
 
 
Fifty Five little candles, one little cake
One little birthday to celebrate.
On November 20th, 1960, oh my!
Ana arrived without wasting much time
They rushed so quickly, so quickly they flew,
grabbing a suitcase with little clothes brand new.
 
Now we look back with smiles, as the years have passed.
We celebrate again and say, how did the years go so fast! 
 
 
 
It's all about the cake(s)

 
 
 
 

 
 
 


 
 



 
 
 
My birthday on my cousin Pete and Terry's wedding in NY. 65'
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Casa Panza My bday - cant remember year!
 
 
 
 

 


 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Happy Birthday to me and Happy Birthday Everybody!

Bonus pictures:

My lovely mother

America Juncadella Great  Grandmother
Paternal Grandparents with
my Tio Gustavo, Tia Fita , My Father and Tia Esther.
 
 
My Tia Fita 101  and still kicking